Letting Her Choose

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I don’t usually write about parenting. Mostly because I don’t have a lot to say. Everyone does it differently. There are thousands of ways to raise great kids, and proportionally very few way to truly screw them up.

I figure since madam is growing, breathing and laughing then we’re doing an ok job so far. 

However. As we get closer to 5 and school, we are beginning to consider our options. 

School. That’s a big question that looms on the horizon. For us as parents and for her as an individual. Do we want her to enter the system? Do we really believe in said system. Is it right for her right now? Will it mesh well with our other plans. Travelling. Exploring. 

This Post sums up how we feel in a lot of ways (insert UK/NZ School system rather than American) We won’t be travelling in the same way as the family from that blog (its a great blog by the way, check it out!) at least not for a few years. But the sentiment rings true.

Our answer? We will let her choose. If she wants to follow her friends into the classroom then we will support her in that. If she doesn’t? That’s fine too. For the time being. We got this. And its still 9 months away.

6 comments on “Letting Her Choose

  1. As parents, I don’t think we can ever go wrong when we let our children lead the way. And how blessed we are to have so many options when it comes to education 🙂

  2. it’s a question i ask myself too… but we’re quite obliged to take her to school because we’re living in a french territory and i “teach” her in spanish at the moment. so it’ll be almost sure that she’ll go to school at 1st degree, luckily she’s born in january so we’ve time to decide.
    and the fact that she wants or doesn’t want to go to school’s primordial. nim’s on preschool now for a few days a week, so she knows what’s all about, i’m sure she’ll make the better decision.
    we know what they’re doing with school, how level’s lower than before and they teach more and more but not deepening because, well, the government’s not interested in critical minds.

    • Its changed so much from when we were young hasn’t it? Are you allowed to home educated in Belgium?

  3. It is difficult, and as you say every child is different. Your ‘link’ seems to have a great attitude to it, and adventures don’t have to be huge for them to take priority over formal schooling, especially at such a young age – that’s how I feel anyway!

    • Thank you. Yes I so agree that the real world experiences and adventures are great teachers. She has some time before we need to worry about exams and academic attainment i think.

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